Tuesday, January 13, 2009

HA HA • I LAUGH AT PAIN



.

In October I suffered an accident that broke my left leg in several places as well as tearing my knee and crushing a couple of vertebrae. After three or four procedures I was prescribed Oxycontin for the chronic pain relief. While it is effective it also has it's drawbacks.

The two posts below this were uploaded while I was suffering the effects of withdrawal from Oxycontin. It's a very powerful painkiller that is easily habit-forming. I never have wanted to be addicted to drugs although I've tried quite a few street kinds. Going cold-turkey when I stopped using cocaine after over a year of use was a "cake walk" compared to this. When I first started using Oxycontin people that I met or knew ALL told me stories of how their friend, dad, brother, mother, husband, wife etc all had a very difficult time with withdrawal. I was getting a little high and getting some good pain relief so even though I knew they were right I thought "I'll deal with that later". I remembered the cocaine and cigarette withdrawals. Well those two were so long ago I probably only remember that I was successful. The only really positive thing that's come out of this is that I have lost 32lbs in the last 3 months. I know I know...I just have to keep it off.

If there is anyone reading this that has a similar problem please get help right away. There is even a drug that can help stop the cravings immediately but must be administered by specialists that are not easy to find. Thanks to those of you that have read this blog recently and have offered support that has meant so much to me.

Here's some good info on Oxycontin:

OxyContin is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is similar to morphine.

OxyContin is used to treat moderate to severe pain. The extended-release form of this medication is for around-the-clock treatment of pain. It is not for treating pain just after a surgery unless you were already taking it before the surgery.

OxyContin may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.
What is the most important information I should know about OxyContin?
OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. OxyContin should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it. Do not drink alcohol while you are taking OxyContin. Dangerous side effects or death can occur when alcohol is combined with a narcotic pain medicine. Check your food and medicine labels to be sure these products do not contain alcohol. Never take more than your prescribed dose of OxyContin. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain. OxyContin can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Do not stop using OxyContin suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.
What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using OxyContin?
Do not use this medication if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others), or to a narcotic cough medicine that contains codeine, hydrocodone, or dihydrocodeine.

You should also not take OxyContin if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.
OxyContin may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. OxyContin should never be given to another person, especially someone who has a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a secure place where others cannot get to it.

Before using OxyContin, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders; liver or kidney disease;
underactive thyroid; curvature of the spine; a history of head injury or brain tumor;
epilepsy or other seizure disorder; low blood pressure; gallbladder disease;
Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders; enlarged prostate, urination problems;
mental illness; or a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby, and could cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. OxyContin can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of this medicine.

One last thing. Really important. If you think that by cutting the pill in half is a way to begin withdrawal DON'T! The pill is a timed release medication and if you open up the contents the full measure will go into your system FULL FORCE. I tried it and found that it was one of the most unpleasant and frightening experience I have ever had.

1 comment:

Penguin said...

Yikes!! Thanks for the info. How frightening for you to go through all of this.

Follow by Email

About Me

My photo
Santa Cruz, CA, United States
I am a very shy introverted photographer. My psycho-therapist says that I may be able to come out of my shell almost any time now.