Thursday, August 17, 2006

ON TOP OF MT. SHASTA

Here's an article from the Mt. Shasta Newspaper that describes how dangerous the climb can be.

This entry was made on November 2, 2009. I remember the location very well. The Red Banks are a very steep outcropping at the top of Avalanche Gulch. It is probably the most difficult (technically) portion of the climb. Why they were attempting an ascent in the middle of the night in late October is very puzzling. Most climbers go up in summer while the snow is still on the ground but the threat of a storm is less likely. To be at the Red Banks at 11 p.m. is foolhearty at best. My group also used Lake Helen as a base camp. Lake Helen is not really a lake at least most of the year. It is covered in snow and there is no water or ice on it.




On June 24, 1989 my Sterling Men's Team and I climbed Mt. Shasta in northern California. It was a physically demanding climb to 14,162 feet. The day we arrived at the top was spectacular. No wind and visibility for miles and miles. We could see Mt. Lassen just to the south. It was the first of several high altitude mountaineering adventures that I shared with this group. That's me in the middle. One of the guys carried plastic glasses and we had a sip of sparkling cider to celebrate. This is a shot of me just as I arrived. Paul Gabriel was just behind me and took the photo.I was so elated about accomplishing the goal of reaching to top. It was quite an achievement. A very small percentage of the people attempting the climb actually make it to the top. I was the first one up and waited for everyone else to finish. After we arrived, another independent climber made it and took the group photo.

1 comment:

ana said...

wow. this is amazing! i bet it was very satisfying to complete. I remember doing a very SMALL climb in Montana, and it was great to really reach my destination.
Congratulations!

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Santa Cruz, CA, United States
I am a very shy introverted photographer. My psycho-therapist says that I may be able to come out of my shell almost any time now.